Michel De Montaigne - was he really a sceptic?

Michel De Montaigne: A modern sceptic? (Part Two)

This two-part blog series analyses the influence of Pyrrhonian Scepticism on Montaigne’s writings. For the first part of this article, take a look at my previous blog. In order to comprehend Montaigne’s use of Pyrrhonism, the Apology for Raymond Sebond (the longest and most debated individual essay), provides a fascinating insight into the implicit epistemological … Continue reading Michel De Montaigne: A modern sceptic? (Part Two)

Michel De Montaigne

Michel De Montaigne: A modern sceptic? (Part One)

Michel Eyquem de Montaigne, Lord of Montaigne (28 February 1533 – 13 September 1592) was one of the most significant philosophers of the French Renaissance, known for popularizing the essay as a literary genre. If you haven’t come across his Essais, I’d recommend just picking a couple at random and starting from there… It’s how … Continue reading Michel De Montaigne: A modern sceptic? (Part One)

Hannah Hoch - Nude Woman Collage

Dada – Pioneering the Patriarchy?

This Long Read blog is inspired in part by my current teaching on Germany in the inter-war years and partly as a self-admonition to visit the current Tate Modern exhibition on Weimar Germany! Titled “Magic Realism” (and on until 14 July), this free show promises an encounter with the “uncanny and mysterious” through the art … Continue reading Dada – Pioneering the Patriarchy?

‘Behold all is vanity and vexation of spirit’ – Art at the British Museum

This was the title Count Christian Dürckheim, who donated almost all the works on display, would have preferred for the British Museum’s showcase of 90 examples of German, modernist art.  Eventually titled Germany Divided – A Search For Identity, the exhibition is more than a mere exploration into ‘modernism.’  Germany Divided represents a very particular moment in the 1960s … Continue reading ‘Behold all is vanity and vexation of spirit’ – Art at the British Museum

The Great War in Portraits: War at the National Portrait Gallery

Imagination, n.:  A warehouse of facts, with a poet and a liar in joint ownership. Ambrose Bierce  Who should win?  The Poet or the Liar? Does it even matter, and are they always destined to be co-owners? This exhibition revolves around contrasts and difficult questions.  It is an incredibly fitting portrayal of a war which … Continue reading The Great War in Portraits: War at the National Portrait Gallery

This is all owned by you – Exploring Bristol Library

To celebrate 400 years of Bristol libraries, and to coincide with national libraries day, Bristol Central Library hosted a ‘behind the scenes’ tour at their beautiful building on College Green. Rusty Squid’s animatronic ‘Book Hive’ (discussed in previous post, ABC: Art, Books and Curious Cats) was still fluttering, shimmering and swarming in the entrance foyer, … Continue reading This is all owned by you – Exploring Bristol Library