Michel De Montaigne - was he really a sceptic?

Michel De Montaigne: A modern sceptic? (Part Two)

This two-part blog series analyses the influence of Pyrrhonian Scepticism on Montaigne’s writings. For the first part of this article, take a look at my previous blog. In order to comprehend Montaigne’s use of Pyrrhonism, the Apology for Raymond Sebond (the longest and most debated individual essay), provides a fascinating insight into the implicit epistemological … Continue reading Michel De Montaigne: A modern sceptic? (Part Two)

Michel De Montaigne

Michel De Montaigne: A modern sceptic? (Part One)

Michel Eyquem de Montaigne, Lord of Montaigne (28 February 1533 – 13 September 1592) was one of the most significant philosophers of the French Renaissance, known for popularizing the essay as a literary genre. If you haven’t come across his Essais, I’d recommend just picking a couple at random and starting from there… It’s how … Continue reading Michel De Montaigne: A modern sceptic? (Part One)

Pablo Picasso, Guernica (1937)

What is Hauntology? Art History at Halloween

As we approach officially the spookiest time of the year, I am putting a spotlight on one of my favourite terms in Art Theory – Hauntology. Aside from the wonderful name, Hauntology is a fascinating concept, with wide-ranging applications across philosophy, sociology, music, history, art history…. and just about any academic or cultural topic you … Continue reading What is Hauntology? Art History at Halloween

SARAH LUCAS: The Venice Biennale, France and Feminism

The 2015 Venice Biennale is now underway, and chosen to represent Britain, is artist Sarah Lucas. Her show, entitled, I SCREAM DADDIO is said to "reprise and reinvent the themes that have come to define her powerfully irreverent art – gender, death, sex, and the innuendo residing in everyday objects." The show revolves around themes … Continue reading SARAH LUCAS: The Venice Biennale, France and Feminism